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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 5:00 pm on March 23, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Ezzo, , , , Oporto, Portugal,   

    Outeiro House / EZZO 


    © João Ferrand

    Architects: EZZO
    Location: Porto,
    Completion: 2011
    Total Area: 165 sqm
    Photographs: João Ferrand

      

    © João Ferrand

    The objective of the project was the conversion of an old house in the area of Porto historical center. The question was to create a single-family house to the 21st century way of living. The house is located in Massarelos, in a tiny picturesque street. During the nineteenth century, Massarelos was one of the areas chosen by the British to build their houses and farmers.

    © João Ferrand

    In the bucolic setting, which to the creation of several footpaths in 2001 (European Capital of Culture), matrix and rural bourgeois, called “Romantic Roads”, this was a very active industrially place during the nineteenth century.

    © João Ferrand

    Given the overriding need to maintain the facade and the existing industrial character of some buildings in the area, we decided to retain the existing facade and the remaining outer walls of the ground and put the new concrete volume in the interior.

    © João Ferrand

    To preserve the traditional surroundings of the site, the house itself becomes a kind of enclosure were the exteriors spaces expand into the interior. The volume of the house is bordered by buildings within the North and South and away from facades, which remained to east and west.

    perspective

    From a material point of view the facade is a passive element, the vertical glass panels give depth to the interior, so you can see and feel the neighboring spaces. Inside, the house is organized on three floors through a central staircase that distributes the inside spaces.
















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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 6:30 am on February 11, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , Portugal,   

    School Of Music In Lisbon / João Luís Carrilho da Graça 


    © FS+SG

    Architect: João Luís Carrilho da Graça
    Location: , Portugal
    Design Team: Giulia de Appolonia, Susana Rato, Paulo Costa, João Manuel Alves, Filipe Homem, Inês Cortesão, Carlos Pereira, Miguel Costa, Pedro Teixeira de Melo, architects. Tiago Castela, Julieta Cunha,Paula Miranda, Joanna Malitzki, Miguel Casal Ribeiro, Frederique Petit, trainees; Nuno Pinto, graphic modelling; Paulo Barreto and Vanda Neto, models
    Area: 16 900 sqm
    Cost: 12 500 000.00 €
    Client: Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa
    Photographs: FS+SG – Fotografia de Arquitectura, João Luís Carrilho da Graça 

    © FS+SG

    When I first started working on this project I happened to be visiting Eero Saarinen’s School of Music in Ann Harbor. Even though the building is interesting, it struck me as odd that no music could be heard in the passageways, not even in the common spaces. At about the same time I watched a documentary about the Music Conservatory in Santiago de Cuba, it was an old colonial house filled with people, joy and music. For this project, I wanted to push to the limits the possibility of acoustic excellence – and also the seclusion and soundproofing of every space –, as well as convey the conviviality and extroversion particular to certain musical practices.

    As for the inside/outside relationship and air-conditioning, I also wanted to achieve the equilibrium, or get the best of both worlds: opening towards the outside and, as an alternative, a mechanical and sophisticated climatization of each space.

    © FS+SG

    The urban struggle for central and accessible sites results in many schools, even music schools, clinics and hospitals being located in very noisy areas such as this. It is a vibrant area with a certain “suburban centrality”.

    The clearest statement of this project was the creation of an exterior space – a large patio covered with grass – formed by a volume that gradually increases in height and protects it from the exterior noise. As the top of the building gently slopes upwards, the rooms grow successively higher, from smaller classrooms meant for instruments that produce a weaker sound (the flute, for instance), to larger rooms meant for percussion instruments.

    © FS+SG

    The outside of the school is an almost blind volume, except for the corners, where large glass surfaces make the view explode on the inside. But not the sound.

    All the public spaces and larger rooms were built in the lower floors. The Auditorium is the main space of the building, with a seating capacity of 448 people. Though it is mainly a teaching space, it should be prepared to host musical performances of the highest level, and thus its acoustic requirements are very demanding. Is form is a wooden shell.

    In addition to the teaching spaces, there are a variety of rooms with different dimensions and another (smaller) auditorium. The great “loggia” that surrounds them serves as a spare space for future extensions to the school. The library, cafeteria, office area and staffrooms occupy the southern part of this floor.

    site plan

    Using concrete as our main building material was a simple way of obtaining high levels of acoustic stability and insulation. Silence. The floor in the rooms is made out of wood. It vibrates.




























     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 6:30 am on February 11, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , Portugal,   

    School Of Music In Lisbon / João Luís Carrilho da Graça 


    © FS+SG

    Architect: João Luís Carrilho da Graça
    Location: , Portugal
    Design Team: Giulia de Appolonia, Susana Rato, Paulo Costa, João Manuel Alves, Filipe Homem, Inês Cortesão, Carlos Pereira, Miguel Costa, Pedro Teixeira de Melo, architects. Tiago Castela, Julieta Cunha,Paula Miranda, Joanna Malitzki, Miguel Casal Ribeiro, Frederique Petit, trainees; Nuno Pinto, graphic modelling; Paulo Barreto and Vanda Neto, models
    Area: 16 900 sqm
    Cost: 12 500 000.00 €
    Client: Instituto Politécnico de Lisboa
    Photographs: FS+SG – Fotografia de Arquitectura, João Luís Carrilho da Graça 

    © FS+SG

    When I first started working on this project I happened to be visiting Eero Saarinen’s School of Music in Ann Harbor. Even though the building is interesting, it struck me as odd that no music could be heard in the passageways, not even in the common spaces. At about the same time I watched a documentary about the Music Conservatory in Santiago de Cuba, it was an old colonial house filled with people, joy and music. For this project, I wanted to push to the limits the possibility of acoustic excellence – and also the seclusion and soundproofing of every space –, as well as convey the conviviality and extroversion particular to certain musical practices.

    As for the inside/outside relationship and air-conditioning, I also wanted to achieve the equilibrium, or get the best of both worlds: opening towards the outside and, as an alternative, a mechanical and sophisticated climatization of each space.

    © FS+SG

    The urban struggle for central and accessible sites results in many schools, even music schools, clinics and hospitals being located in very noisy areas such as this. It is a vibrant area with a certain “suburban centrality”.

    The clearest statement of this project was the creation of an exterior space – a large patio covered with grass – formed by a volume that gradually increases in height and protects it from the exterior noise. As the top of the building gently slopes upwards, the rooms grow successively higher, from smaller classrooms meant for instruments that produce a weaker sound (the flute, for instance), to larger rooms meant for percussion instruments.

    © FS+SG

    The outside of the school is an almost blind volume, except for the corners, where large glass surfaces make the view explode on the inside. But not the sound.

    All the public spaces and larger rooms were built in the lower floors. The Auditorium is the main space of the building, with a seating capacity of 448 people. Though it is mainly a teaching space, it should be prepared to host musical performances of the highest level, and thus its acoustic requirements are very demanding. Is form is a wooden shell.

    In addition to the teaching spaces, there are a variety of rooms with different dimensions and another (smaller) auditorium. The great “loggia” that surrounds them serves as a spare space for future extensions to the school. The library, cafeteria, office area and staffrooms occupy the southern part of this floor.

    site plan

    Using concrete as our main building material was a simple way of obtaining high levels of acoustic stability and insulation. Silence. The floor in the rooms is made out of wood. It vibrates.




























     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 5:00 pm on February 7, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , Guedes + DeCampos, , Institutional Architecture, Landscape, Peso da Régua, Portugal, Vilarinho dos Freires   

    Quinta Do Vallado Winery / Francisco Vieira de Campos 


    © Nelson Garrido

    Architects: Guedes + DeCampos – Francisco Vieira de Campos
    Location: , Peso da Régua, Portugal
    Project Year: 2011
    Photographs: Nelson Garrido

    © Nelson Garrido

    In a landscape as unique and astonishing as Douro, any intervention must be very precise. That’s why the first challenge was to underline the distinctive identity of the project while carefully respecting the landscape. Each gesture had to be incisive, adapting itself to the given programme while conquering an expressiveness that could value both the built complex and the surrounding landscape.

    The expansion project for Quinta do Vallado included two areas of intervention – production and leisure – and a supplemental challenge: to mantain and to integrate the pre-existing buildings in a new complex with a clearly contemporary vocabulary. The unification of all these purposes needed great technical precision and resulted in great simplicity, both in the use of material and in the creation of forms. This assured minimal impact to the landscape but the same economy of means was used to create very seductive spaces. Seduction of the visitor was always part of the game.













     
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