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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 7:43 pm on March 25, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Haroon Moghul, Haroon Moghul Video, , , Politics,   

    Haroon Moghul – If Society Fails 


    Click here to view the embedded video.

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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 12:41 pm on February 22, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , Politics   

    Cartoon: Saved … 


    This cartoon by Dave Brown from The Independent relates to the new bailout package for Greece, which was agreed by eurozone finance ministers early on Tuesday. The €130bn rescue package should avert the risk of a Greek default, but, in return, Germany and France insisted that Greece agree to harsh new austerity terms even though country has been living with punishing austerity for much of the past two years: unemployment has reached record heights at over 21%, while the economy contracted by 7% in the last quarter of 2011. Read more »

    The cartoon shows German Chancellor Angela Merkel as a doctor using defibrillation paddles to rescucitate the Greek patient (note the Greek flag used as a sheet). French President Nicolas Sarkozy stands ready with a carving dish, knife and fork.

    COMMENTARY
    One possible interpretation is that Merkel has actually killed the patient with an enormous electrical shock (i.e., too much austerity). Meanwhile, Sarkozy is preparing to take his (or rather the EU’s) ‘pound of flesh’. We use this expression when something which is owed is ruthlessly required to be paid back (see here for origin).

    ALSO SEE
    Greece bailout: Large protests expected against cuts (BBC News)
    Greece bailout agreed by eurozone finance ministers – video (The Guardian)
    Doubts over viability of new Greece rescue deal (The Independent)
    Steve Bell cartoon (The Guardian)
    Demanding a pound of flesh (Morning Star)

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 1:39 pm on February 20, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , Politics   

    Cartoon: Greece Goes Off A Cliff 



    In this cartoon from The Daily Telegraph, Christian Adams uses the ‘going off a cliff’ metaphor (see here, here, and here for other examples) to comment on Germany’s changing attitude to the Greek debt crisis.

    In the top two panels, German Chancellor Angela Merkel tries to warn Greek Prime Minister Lucas Papademos that he is walking towards the cliff edge. Merkel seems genuinely alarmed. However, when Papademos carries on walking on air rather than plunging into the void, Merkel becomes impatient and starts looking at her watch, waiting for him to fall.

    The message seems to be that after trying to save Greece from disaster with the carrot and stick approach of bailouts and austerity measures, Germany has now accepted the inevitable: that Greece is a lost cause and it is only a matter of time before its economy crashes.

    ALSO SEE
    Greece can slay its financial demons – but will it spare the euro? (The Guardian)
    Greece in final bailout talks in Brussels (The Guardian)
    Germany bows to global pressure and signals Greek rescue deal (Daily Telegraph)

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 12:03 pm on February 19, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , Politics   

    Cartoon: The Theft of Greek Democracy 


    In this cartoon from The Independent, Dave Brown uses the theft by armed robbers of over 60 priceless artefacts from a Greek museum on Friday as a metaphor for the theft of Greek democracy by the EU.

    A group of robbers dressed from head to toe in black are stealing stones from a Greek museum and loading them into a van with a ‘Brussels’ numberplate. The stones spell out the word ‘DEMOCRACY’. Who are the faceless thieves? According to Peter Osborne writing in The Telegraph: “Brussels bureaucrats who are threatening to bankrupt an entire country unless opposition parties promise to support the EU-backed austerity plan.”

    VOCABULARY
    A robber is someone who steals money or property from a bank, a shop, etc. Thief is a more general term for someone who steals something from another person. So all robbers are thieves, but not vice versa. Likewise, robbery is the crime of stealing money or property from a bank, a shop, etc., while theft is the crime of stealing. So all robberies are thefts, but not vice versa.

    ALSO SEE
    Greece is being destroyed by ‘respectable’ fanatics (The Guardian)
    The callous cruelty of the EU is destroying Greece, a once-proud country (The Daily Telegraph)
    Robbers Steal Olympic Artifacts from Greek Museum (Voice of America)
    Manhunt launched in dramatic Greek museum robbery (CNN)
    Two armed robbers tie up a female guard and loot Ancient Olympia museum stealing priceless Greek antiques (Mail Online)

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 12:03 pm on February 19, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , Politics   

    Cartoon: The Theft of Greek Democracy 


    In this cartoon from The Independent, Dave Brown uses the theft by armed robbers of over 60 priceless artefacts from a Greek museum on Friday as a metaphor for the theft of Greek democracy by the EU.

    A group of robbers dressed from head to toe in black are stealing stones from a Greek museum and loading them into a van with a ‘Brussels’ numberplate. The stones spell out the word ‘DEMOCRACY’. Who are the faceless thieves? According to Peter Osborne writing in The Telegraph: “Brussels bureaucrats who are threatening to bankrupt an entire country unless opposition parties promise to support the EU-backed austerity plan.”

    VOCABULARY
    A robber is someone who steals money or property from a bank, a shop, etc. Thief is a more general term for someone who steals something from another person. So all robbers are thieves, but not vice versa. Likewise, robbery is the crime of stealing money or property from a bank, a shop, etc., while theft is the crime of stealing. So all robberies are thefts, but not vice versa.

    ALSO SEE
    Greece is being destroyed by ‘respectable’ fanatics (The Guardian)
    The callous cruelty of the EU is destroying Greece, a once-proud country (The Daily Telegraph)
    Robbers Steal Olympic Artifacts from Greek Museum (Voice of America)
    Manhunt launched in dramatic Greek museum robbery (CNN)
    Two armed robbers tie up a female guard and loot Ancient Olympia museum stealing priceless Greek antiques (Mail Online)

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 11:34 am on February 13, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Politics,   

    Reuters Video: Greece backs bailout as Athens burns 


    The Greek parliament approves a controversial bailout package against a backdrop of rioting. Paul Chapman reports.

    TRANSCRIPT
    REPORTER: The Greek capital resembled something like a war zone after a night of street battles, burning buildings and looted shops. The rioting was a backlash against government cutbacks needed to avert bankruptcy. The trouble is also a taste of what may be to come. In a midnight ballot the Greek parliament voted by a wide majority to back the 170 billion dollar package of measures. They include deep pay, pension and job cuts. The minimum wage alone will be cut by more than a fifth. Culture Minister Pavlos Geroulanos is defending the plans.
    PAVLOS GEROULANOS: “Most of the people see the vote as the measures, and that is why they are reacting to it, and rightly so, but the reality is that it puts Greece on a completely new footing in order to develop its economy again that is what we should all be focussed on right now.”
    REPORTER: Forty-three lawmakers who rebelled by voting against were immediately expelled from their parties but many were unrepentant.
    VASSO PAPANDREOU, PASOK PARTY: “After a long time, I voted with my conscience, and I feel happy with my conscience. I was expelled from PASOK but they cannot expel my opinions or my history.”
    REPORTER: The bailout package was demanded by the European Union and International Monetary Fund in exchange for funds to meet debt repayments. The alternative for Greece was a chaotic default which could shake the entire euro zone. But many Greeks believe their living standards are collapsing already and the new measures will only add to their misery. Greek state television reported violent scenes in other cities including Thessaloniki in the north, and the tourist islands of Corfu and Crete. Sunday’s scenes of violence may be only the start before the new cutbacks begin to bite. Paul Chapman, Reuters.

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 11:34 am on February 13, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Politics,   

    Reuters Video: Greece backs bailout as Athens burns 


    The Greek parliament approves a controversial bailout package against a backdrop of rioting. Paul Chapman reports.

    TRANSCRIPT
    REPORTER: The Greek capital resembled something like a war zone after a night of street battles, burning buildings and looted shops. The rioting was a backlash against government cutbacks needed to avert bankruptcy. The trouble is also a taste of what may be to come. In a midnight ballot the Greek parliament voted by a wide majority to back the 170 billion dollar package of measures. They include deep pay, pension and job cuts. The minimum wage alone will be cut by more than a fifth. Culture Minister Pavlos Geroulanos is defending the plans.
    PAVLOS GEROULANOS: “Most of the people see the vote as the measures, and that is why they are reacting to it, and rightly so, but the reality is that it puts Greece on a completely new footing in order to develop its economy again that is what we should all be focussed on right now.”
    REPORTER: Forty-three lawmakers who rebelled by voting against were immediately expelled from their parties but many were unrepentant.
    VASSO PAPANDREOU, PASOK PARTY: “After a long time, I voted with my conscience, and I feel happy with my conscience. I was expelled from PASOK but they cannot expel my opinions or my history.”
    REPORTER: The bailout package was demanded by the European Union and International Monetary Fund in exchange for funds to meet debt repayments. The alternative for Greece was a chaotic default which could shake the entire euro zone. But many Greeks believe their living standards are collapsing already and the new measures will only add to their misery. Greek state television reported violent scenes in other cities including Thessaloniki in the north, and the tourist islands of Corfu and Crete. Sunday’s scenes of violence may be only the start before the new cutbacks begin to bite. Paul Chapman, Reuters.

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 11:38 am on February 11, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Politics,   

    Words in the News: Scrutinize 


    Simmering discontent among Greek politicians on Friday tested a deal reached just a day earlier to support austerity policies demanded by the government’s international creditors, unnerving investors seeking assurance that Greece will get a fresh bailout and escape a catastrophic debt default. Full story »

    VOCABULARY
    If you scrutinize something, you examine it very carefully, often to find out some information from it or about it. • The European Union’s competition regulator will decide whether to approve Google’s takeover of cellphone maker Motorola or take more time to scrutinize the deal.

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 11:38 am on February 11, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , Politics,   

    Words in the News: Scrutinize 


    Simmering discontent among Greek politicians on Friday tested a deal reached just a day earlier to support austerity policies demanded by the government’s international creditors, unnerving investors seeking assurance that Greece will get a fresh bailout and escape a catastrophic debt default. Full story »

    VOCABULARY
    If you scrutinize something, you examine it very carefully, often to find out some information from it or about it. • The European Union’s competition regulator will decide whether to approve Google’s takeover of cellphone maker Motorola or take more time to scrutinize the deal.

     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 3:20 pm on February 10, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , , , , , , , , , , Politics   

    London Expert Predictions For The Mayoral Elections 


    On Wednesday night, Londonist gathered together a group of London experts from all corners of capital for an evening upstairs at the Windsor Castle in Victoria, to harvest their predictions for the upcoming mayoral elections.

    As part of the event, we asked attendees to give their opinions on twelve questions on about the elections, and totted up the results for a quick picture of what they thought we could expect from 2012′s Ken vs. Boris grudge match.

    The headline result was that, whilst a slim majority of those present backed Ken Livingstone as their preferred candidate, a clear majority felt that, when all the votes were counted, Boris Johnson would be victorious, with many commenting afterwards that this was largely due to the boundaries of outer London.

    When we asked what people would do with a spare £60m if they were London mayor, a range of answers came flooding in. The equal leaders from our options were Build a cable car andDevelop a new bus and put 200 on the road”, but write in votes included “Abscond and have plastic surgery”, “Turn Oxford Street into a social housing development with swimming pool” and “Whatever I was elected to do”.

    Next we asked what the most important issues would be at the elections, and transport dominated, with the leading option being transport fares, closely followed by transport infrastructure, with housing and policing in joint third place. When we asked about whether the top three parties had chosen the right candidates, the selected candidates all won, with a strong showing by Steve Norris for the Tories and Lembit Opik for the Lib Dems.

    Next we presented a range of rather leading statements, and asked the group to choose which one they most agreed with. In the first, titled “London is…”, most of the group chose “London is stupid to have decided to have the Olympics”, but a more positive close second was the statement that “London is lucky to have two of the UK’s finest politicians willing to be its mayor”.

    In the second part, most thought that “Boris is an old Etonian who thinks it is his right to be mayor, but would rather be Prime Minister”, though the second most popular choice was “Boris is a pretty decent chap actually”. When we asked about Ken, most chose that “Ken Livingstone is a grasping scheming politician who will do anything for power”, though the second largest group chose “Ken Livingstone is an old man who likes newts”.

    Next, most knew that “Brian Paddick is the Lib Dem policeman lad who keeps fighting Boris and Ken to be London Mayor”, though he must do more to raise his profile as a few confused souls chose “Brian Paddick is the bloke who cleaned out my guttering last summer”.

    Finally, we asked which roads be resurfaced in London, prompting replies of everything from Salisbury Road, Romford, to Deptford High Street, and the troubled Hammersmith Flyover. However, one less picky respondent was just happy for “Anywhere outside Zone 1” to get some care and attention.

    The evening ended with the results of a Boris drawing-competition, for which readers will have to wait a little longer.

    Attendees on Wednesday were Ianvisits, Snipe, Fresh Eyes on London, Janeslondon, Discovering London, Caroline’s Miscellany, 853, one of Occupylsx, Westminster Walking, Londonist and others to whom we apologise if we have missed them.

    Londonist’s election coverage begins next week. In the run up to 3 May we’ll be exploring the issues, probing the personalities, fact-checking campaign claims, interrogating data and finding out what you think. Save the date for our big election results night party on Friday 4 May.

     
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