Tagged: houses Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 3:00 pm on April 6, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: a21 studio, Ho Chi Minh, houses, , , Vietnam   

    3×9 House / a21 studio 


    © Hiroyuki Oki

    Architects: a21 studio – Hiệp Hòa Nguyễn, Nhơn Quí Nguyễn
    Location: Ho Chi Minh,
    Project Area: 27 sqm
    Completed: 2012
    Photographs: Hiroyuki Oki

       

    © Hiroyuki Oki

    Even in Ho Chi Minh, a chaotic and highly density city, a 3 m wide and 9 m deep plot in a narrow street is still considered as a thorny problem for renovating an old house to a more comfortable and functional space. The house is designed for a middle age woman and her friend, who are inspired by music and beauty of nature.

    © Hiroyuki Oki

    The modesty and cleanliness are the first impressions of the house look. Horizontal louvers embellished with some flowers give distinction but not strange to its exterior in compare with neighbours. The ground floor seems to be larger and tidier because of the combination of living room, dinner, and kitchen without any partitions to define the spaces. The familiar materials such as bricks and steels are used flexibly to add raw feeling to these man-made spaces.

    © Hiroyuki Oki

    Moreover, nature is delivered into the house by the introduction of a tree right at the entrance. This tree, as a living body, not only softens rough sides of the design but also connect the ground space to the upper space. The second floor with the same language is the space where bedroom and toilet are located, emphasize the rich of daylight due to its openness to the sky.

    axonometric

    The connection between bedroom and toilet is collection of sparse wooden pieces, which cause flows of light, wind, rain and even human intentions among the house. This is also the place where the tree meets its need for sunlight. Thus, it can be said that nature is skilfully to any corners of the house by creating “connecting space” which bridges and adjusts the difference domains and places, from outside to the ground floor and the second floor before being back to outside through the roof opening up to the sky.


















    Advertisements
     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 4:30 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , houses, , Melbourne, Phooey Architects,   

    Ashburton House / Phooey Architects 


    © Peter Bennetts

    Architects: Phooey Architects
    Location: ,
    Site: 840 sqm
    Floor Area: 240 sqm
    Year Competed: 2009
    Project Team: Peter Ho, Emma Young, Lucy Williams, Leigh de Longville, James Baradine & Alan Ting
    Structural Engineer: Perrett Simpson Stantin
    Landscape Design: Simon Ellis
    Photographer: Peter Bennetts

    © Peter Bennetts

    The form of the new house is an extruded L shape, two storeys tall. The inside of the L is lined with windows that face a linear park & its canopy of trees to the south-east of the site. “The new house was designed around one long view,” says Peter, & it is as simple as that. All the rooms take advantage of it … The house is planned around views from the inside, yet the aesthetic focus is mainly on the exterior. The metal-clad upper storey, with its jutting, angled planes, is not mere sculptural play, however.

    floor plans

    Peter describes it as a “sawtooth facade.” Like a roof on its side, it is a self-shading wall – the angled planes block summer sun from striking & heating the surface … Inside the house, there is a joyous feeling of being in the tree canopy, with the park stretching into the distance … Multiple access points allow the clients’ children to run around & through the house. There is a real empathy with how children will perceive & enjoy the space in the way Peter speaks about the internal planning.










     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 2:30 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , Brisbane, houses, , Richard Kirk Architect,   

    Arbour House / Richard Kirk Architect 


    © Scott Burrows

    Architects: Richard Kirk Architect
    Location: New Farm, Brisbane, Queensland,
    Completed: 2009
    Structural Engineer: Bornhorst & Ward
    Hydraulic Engineer: Cushway Blackford
    Photographer: Scott Burrows

     

    © Scott Burrows

    Arbour House, located on the Bulimba Reach of the Brisbane River, is a study in siting and intricate articulation to yield views and landscape connections . The long thin 13 meter wide site is located between two key public spaces, namely an established historic arbour of fig trees and a public riverfront boardwalk. The site which once formed part of the surrounding multi-residential enclave is now distinquished by a new single detached dwelling. Unlike other riverfront houses, the new dwelling is sited a respectful distance from the rivers edge, preserving an 80 year old Poincianna tree and historic public views from the boardwalk of the adjoing heritage listed dwelling.

    © Scott Burrows

    The large setback creates a platform for a private garden under the shade of the canopy of the Poincianna tree. The level of the platform and the height of the Poincianna tree and the Arbour established the two datums for the setout of public and private spaces of the dwelling. The public riverfront living levels are adjacent to this space whislt the rear living spaces are elevated above the garage to look into the canopy of the Arbour. The private bedroom spaces of the upper level are raised to a height to afford views of the tree canopy and river yet privacy from the public river boardwalk.

    © Scott Burrows

    The dwelling adopts a courtyard typology with two pavillions linked by a large double height stairwell and external courtyard. The form is conceptualised as an object carved from a solid volume of the allowable building area with the courtyard providing a protective volume from which to cross ventilate each of the spaces of the house and to allow the different spaces of the house connection but also discrete and subtle separation – the family home as a village.

    © Scott Burrows

    The long section of the dwelling is key – the front pavilion folds and adjusts to its riverfront landscape while the rear pavillion is raised higher to enjoy views onto the canopy of the surounding arbour and facilitate a cross view through the long site to the river. The dwelling orientates itself around a large external courtyard. The courtyard articulates the form of the dwelling and creates a heroic moment from which to enter.

    © Scott Burrows

    The northern face of the building form is articulated by rotating the external walls 15 degrees. The walls peel away from each other resulting in thin vertical fissures which allow northern light and breezes to filter through. The vertical fissures afford the significant rooms of the house a private visual connection to views down the longest reach of the Brisbane River.

    1st floor plan

    The materiality of the dwelling is defined by an exterior and interior skin. The external zinc clad skin acts as a robust barrier to the elements wrapping and folding to protect the inner skins that are generally made of recycled bespoke timbers employed as facade systems and cladding layers. The internal skin is comprised of a number of recycled timbers selected for their durability and colour. The timber is tailored like a bespoke piece of joinery to the specific requirements of the spaces and the spaces are treated in a similar manner whether internal or external.

















     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 1:00 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Bukit Timah, houses, , , Singapore, Topos Design Studio   

    Sunset / Topos Design Studio 


    © Derek Swalwell

    Architects: Topos Design Studio – Alan Fan, Lim Hong Kian
    Location: Bukit Timah, Singapore
    Main Contractor: Millard Pte Ltd
    Quantity Surveyor: Barton Associates Pte Ltd
    Civil and Structural Engineer: First Engineer Consultants
    Completion: 2007
    Site: 950 sqm
    Floor Area: 590 sqm
    Photographs: Derek Swalwell

    © Derek Swalwell

    Situated in a secluded cul-de-sac in the fashionable area of Bukit Timah in Singapore, this private family residence is a beautiful and understated piece of bespoke and holistic architectural design. The modest entrance façade gently invites you through into a stunning pool area which reveals the U-shaped plan of the building. This form allows for seclusion as well as views of the pool area from virtually every room in the house as well as fantastic ventilation through full height sliding louver and glass doors. This is helped by the orientation of residence to make full use of the day and night prevailing breeze.

    © Derek Swalwell

    The simple no fuss architectural language of the house is further accentuated by a 4 tone colour palette to not only highlight the form, but also to allow the client’s stunning pieces of furniture to take centre stage. This unpretentious approach in keeping to the natural and simplistic setting of the built environment led to a refined and elegant feel to the spaces, worthy of the esteemed client.

    © Derek Swalwell

    The quality of light and the form on the interior spaces were key to the design which is evident from the generously proportioned lounge and the double height dining area of the first floor. These grand rooms offer fantastic spaces for the family to congregate and enjoy time together.

    © Derek Swalwell

    The second floor of the property is dedicated to the private realms of the users and a relaxing alternative lounge away from the main family area. A comprehensive aluminum louver system, across this floor, aids in sun shading, so as to minimize air-con usageas well as to offer exclusive and spiritual privacy against the surrounding properties.

    basement plan

    Materials Used
    Some Materials and Finishes used for the Surfaces, Partitions, Floorings, Walls:
    1. BiancoCarraraand Molton Brown Marble for Living, Dining, Dry Kitchen floor.
    2. Bush hammered and flamed Kur Grey Granite for all outdoors and external walls.
    3. Blue turquoise mosaic for the pool and Burmese Teak Timber flooring for all bedrooms and common corridors.
    4. Calacatta Oro and Breccia Paradiso Marble for all the bathrooms. Various vinyl backed Essex Singapore Wall paper for all the bedrooms and common areas.

    first floor plan

    5. Duravit, Hansgrohe and GerebitSanitary Wares and system
    6. Jung EIB Switch Systems
    7. Ferro Aluminum Sun shading and Window System
    8. Hunter Douglas Mechanical Sun shading Blinds
    9. RIMADESIO Velaria Glass Sliding Partition Door System supplied By Vivo Systems Singapore
    10. Ironmongeries by Dorma Systems andHewi180 Series (Door Handles)

    Summarised Design Concept
    1. Proportioned, Timeless, Tailored Elegance


















     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 5:00 pm on March 23, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Ezzo, houses, , , Oporto, ,   

    Outeiro House / EZZO 


    © João Ferrand

    Architects: EZZO
    Location: Porto,
    Completion: 2011
    Total Area: 165 sqm
    Photographs: João Ferrand

      

    © João Ferrand

    The objective of the project was the conversion of an old house in the area of Porto historical center. The question was to create a single-family house to the 21st century way of living. The house is located in Massarelos, in a tiny picturesque street. During the nineteenth century, Massarelos was one of the areas chosen by the British to build their houses and farmers.

    © João Ferrand

    In the bucolic setting, which to the creation of several footpaths in 2001 (European Capital of Culture), matrix and rural bourgeois, called “Romantic Roads”, this was a very active industrially place during the nineteenth century.

    © João Ferrand

    Given the overriding need to maintain the facade and the existing industrial character of some buildings in the area, we decided to retain the existing facade and the remaining outer walls of the ground and put the new concrete volume in the interior.

    © João Ferrand

    To preserve the traditional surroundings of the site, the house itself becomes a kind of enclosure were the exteriors spaces expand into the interior. The volume of the house is bordered by buildings within the North and South and away from facades, which remained to east and west.

    perspective

    From a material point of view the facade is a passive element, the vertical glass panels give depth to the interior, so you can see and feel the neighboring spaces. Inside, the house is organized on three floors through a central staircase that distributes the inside spaces.
















     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 12:30 am on March 23, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Barcelona, , H Architectes, houses, , ,   

    House 804 / H Architectes 


    © Pedro Antonio Pérez

    Architects: H Arquitectes -David Lorente, JosepRicart, Xavier Ros, Roger Tudó
    Location: Parets del Vallès, , Spain
    Collaborators: Blai Cabrero Bosch, Montse Fornés Guàrdia
    Quantity Surveyor: Iñaki González de Mendiguchía
    Completion: 2011
    Surface Constructed: 160 sqm
    Photographs: Pedro Antonio Pérez

    © Pedro Antonio Pérez

    Located in a pleasant residential neighbourhood, the house is a compact building (almost a cube) surrounded by a 3 meters wide perimeter necessary courtyard, which is the minimum mandatory gap based on current regulations. The pre-existing yard, the swimming-pool and the shed set at the back of the plot are preserved by the express wish of the owners.

    © Pedro Antonio Pérez

    The perimeter courtyard, which completely surrounds the house, it is like an outside lounge connected in different ways and intensities with the main interior pieces of the ground floor, giving different qualities and uses to each façade: on the south, a sunny garden is connected with the kitchen; on the west, with the main entrance; on the east, an uncovered parking place with direct access to the kitchen and finally, on the north, a large terrace links the house with the upper garden level and the pre-existing swimming pool.

    © Pedro Antonio Pérez

    The house is made of black concrete block, a material used to solve the load-bearing wall structure and the façades. All the surrounding courtyard elements (fences, pavements, benches, etc.) are also built with the same concrete block working as a unit. Vegetation will finally stamp in time to reach the pretended ambience and character.

    © Pedro Antonio Pérez

    The structure of the house is a load-bearing wall system with three concentric walls, one for each floor, working only under compression. As a consequence, the inner wall ends at the ground floor level, the intermediate at the first floor and the façade reaches the roof floor.

    detail

    Inside the house, in the main rooms, the concrete block walls are not covered.
    For the stairs pavement we used recycled hydraulic pieces coming from the old house of the plot. Under the stairs, where the block walls are wider (30cm), a central fire place faces both the living room and the kitchen.




















     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 1:00 pm on March 22, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , Dierendonck blancke Architecten, , Ghent, houses, ,   

    House 12k / Dierendonck Blancke Architecten 


    © Filip Dujardin

    Architects: Dierendonck Blancke Architecten
    Location: , Belgium
    Design Team: Alexander Dierendonck, Isabelle Blancke, Marie Decoene
    Engineering: Arthur De Roover, Structure
    Surface: 108 sqm
    Budget: 145,000 euro
    Realisation: 2010
    Photographer: Filip Dujardin

    © Filip Dujardin

    Terraced House 12K
    The first steps taken by the architect and the client start with the search of a suitable building site. Under the architect’s advice, two neighboring houses were purchased, which exceeded the budget of the client. However, this allowed them to redefine the plot boundary and construct a new house on one of the two plots. During the construction of the house, the client could continue living in the adjoining house before selling it.

    © Filip Dujardin

    Program / Site
    The programme includes the construction of a small house, for a limited budget in the center of the city of Ghent. The site is a narrow and deep plot, where three floors can be realized.

    © Filip Dujardin

    Concept
    Given the limited width of the site, the design was developed within the section. By seeing the house as a sequence of three elements/parts with varying heights, different conditions could be realized. The first two parts consist of three floors which are connected by a central staircase. The stairs serve the different levels that vary in floor height. This creates different perspectives and a continuity of space. A skylight over the entire surface of the stairwell allows natural light to penetrate deep into the house.

    © Filip Dujardin

    Construction
    One enters the house trough an area with a low ceiling, that is primarily used as a vestibule/storage between the street and living space. The dining room and kitchen in the second part of the house have a substantial ceiling height, creating a visual relationship with the office space above the entrance hall. This space is a home office inbetween the street and the living space. In the extended area of the dining room and kitchen, is the living room. Using an identical skylight as in the stairwell, natural light extends into the center of the living room.

    © Filip Dujardin

    The split level staircase serves the bathroom above the office space, and two rooms above the dining area . By extending the height of the second part of the house within the allowed urban reglementations, it was possible to realize a mezzanine in the upper bedroom on the second floor, and thus achieving maximum use of the floor space. During the construction of the house, the client decided to add a garden shed to the program. This became the fourth and final element in the back of the building plot.

    first level plan

    Roof
    This terraced house is situated in a conservation area of the city and is served with a number of planning rules to answer to. In consultation with the urban design services, there was opted for a sloped roof parallel to the street. This principle was applied to all four elements of the house.

    second level plan

    Materialization
    The concept of the succession of the four parts are drawn in the use of materials and detailing. The bare structure is considered as finishing and expresses the concept. The house consists of two longitudinal walls of painted brick.The rooms are divided by transverse walls erected in concrete blocks. There is no distinction between materials for the exterior and interior shell. The exterior facades and interior walls are in the same concrete block, where the same block window principle is also used.











































     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 9:00 am on March 21, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , houses, , , ,   

    10 Ken House / Coordinate House NOGAMI 


    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    Architects: Coordinate House NOGAMI – Yuki Nogami
    Location: , Ehime,
    Site Area: 274.00 sqm
    Total Floor Area: 217.12 sqm
    Project Year: 2009
    Photographs: Naoto Kawai, Yuki Nogami

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    I wanted to make a house in the new Japanese style, while also keeping it somewhat nostalgic. To make the house lead to the client’s parents’ house (the main house), I used a few methods: the first one was to unify the common parking lot entrance of the 2 households, making each one easier to navigate; the other was to use a machining technique much like the traditional method of chopping trees.

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    By adopting this traditional method, we were designing a new concept of contemporary Japan. In this way I applied the culture of the tree and the aesthetic sense of Japan. We think of this house as a collection of constructions, and we produced a design that seems to be made out of various different structures. To create an interior space that feels exterior, a private space that feels public, a hall that feels like an avenue. A space where children can run around.

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    Beyond making city streets like courtyards in order to make them feel more connected to the houses, we want to try and envision the architecture of the future, moving past the inside-outside relationship to find new types of connections. Paint from natural materials has been used on the stucco wall. The color balance was planned at an early stage. The structural materials are of cypress, cedar, local chestnut. The flooring is pine and birch.

    elevation

    Other Features: I have created a wooden louver in order to ensure privacy. All joinery, including this louver, fit in the door pocket. There are 3 types of joinery: the glass door, the door with insect-netting, and the Louver door. It is possible to adjust for wind and solar.




























     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 9:00 am on March 21, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , houses, , , ,   

    10 Ken House / Coordinate House NOGAMI 


    Architects: Coordinate House NOGAMI – Yuki Nogami
    Location: , Ehime, Japan
    Site Area: 274.00 sqm
    Total Floor Area: 217.12 sqm
    Project Year: 2009
    Photographs: Naoto Kawai, Yuki Nogami

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    I wanted to make a house in the new Japanese style, while also keeping it somewhat nostalgic. To make the house lead to the client’s parents’ house (the main house), I used a few methods: the first one was to unify the common parking lot entrance of the 2 households, making each one easier to navigate; the other was to use a machining technique much like the traditional method of chopping trees.

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    By adopting this traditional method, we were designing a new concept of contemporary Japan. In this way I applied the culture of the tree and the aesthetic sense of Japan. We think of this house as a collection of constructions, and we produced a design that seems to be made out of various different structures. To create an interior space that feels exterior, a private space that feels public, a hall that feels like an avenue. A space where children can run around.

    Courtesy of Coordinate House NOGAMI

    Beyond making city streets like courtyards in order to make them feel more connected to the houses, we want to try and envision the architecture of the future, moving past the inside-outside relationship to find new types of connections. Paint from natural materials has been used on the stucco wall. The color balance was planned at an early stage. The structural materials are of cypress, cedar, local chestnut. The flooring is pine and birch.

    elevation

    Other Features: I have created a wooden louver in order to ensure privacy. All joinery, including this louver, fit in the door pocket. There are 3 types of joinery: the glass door, the door with insect-netting, and the Louver door. It is possible to adjust for wind and solar.




























     
  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 1:00 pm on March 20, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: , houses, , Lima, Peru, , Vértice Arquitectos   

    Beach House I-5 / Vértice Arquitectos 


    Courtesy of

    Architects: Vértice Arquitectos
    Location: Las Lomas del Mar Beach, , Perú
    Size: 250 sqm
    Client: Private
    Photographs: Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

       

    Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

    This house was designed in the first row, plot 5 in Lomas del Mar beach in Cerro Azul, 120Km. south of Lima. The plot is a rocky and sandy hill in a half curved shape that reaches 48 meters high above the sea level and drops steeply 8 meters in its lowest part. It has a 180° view to the Pacific Ocean to the south, and a panoramic view of the beach to the east and to the north.

    Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

    The two main goals to develop the project were to fully exploit the best possible view to the ocean from the social area, as well as from the master bedroom, and to make the most of the plot of land. Two parallel volumes were designed, to accomplish the first objective, one of which leans on the other, which is 1.20 meters higher, to have the view of the sea. The volumes are joined by a main circulation axis which ends in a swimming pool overlooking the beach.

    Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

    To make the most of the plot big cantilevers were designed, since the useful area of the plot was reducing while the project was reaching the highest level. The first volume is found to the left of the entrance of the house, where most of the bedrooms have been located. The master room and the adjoining terrace are revolved 45° as to have the view of the sea. The second volume, to the right, locates the social and service areas in the first level. A family room and a guest room are located in the second level.

    Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

    A two-story living and dining room area ends in the swimming pool and in a terrace perpendicular to it. The family room, in the second level, is spatially opened to the living and dining room in the first level, and has also an open view to the ocean. The staircase to the second level is made in natural concrete and flies over the kitchen separating this area from the living and dining room.

    Courtesy of Vértice Arquitectos

    The materials used in the project have been: exposed concrete, white painting in the walls, stainless steel, tempered glass and granite stone. The latter has been used to cover the base on which the volumes rest, with the intention of separating these from the natural terrain. The pool is closed by a double face laminated glass in the external face that permits the same transparency to a view of the sea as the rest of the house.















     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel