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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 4:30 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Australia, , , Melbourne, Phooey Architects,   

    Ashburton House / Phooey Architects 


    © Peter Bennetts

    Architects: Phooey Architects
    Location: ,
    Site: 840 sqm
    Floor Area: 240 sqm
    Year Competed: 2009
    Project Team: Peter Ho, Emma Young, Lucy Williams, Leigh de Longville, James Baradine & Alan Ting
    Structural Engineer: Perrett Simpson Stantin
    Landscape Design: Simon Ellis
    Photographer: Peter Bennetts

    © Peter Bennetts

    The form of the new house is an extruded L shape, two storeys tall. The inside of the L is lined with windows that face a linear park & its canopy of trees to the south-east of the site. “The new house was designed around one long view,” says Peter, & it is as simple as that. All the rooms take advantage of it … The house is planned around views from the inside, yet the aesthetic focus is mainly on the exterior. The metal-clad upper storey, with its jutting, angled planes, is not mere sculptural play, however.

    floor plans

    Peter describes it as a “sawtooth facade.” Like a roof on its side, it is a self-shading wall – the angled planes block summer sun from striking & heating the surface … Inside the house, there is a joyous feeling of being in the tree canopy, with the park stretching into the distance … Multiple access points allow the clients’ children to run around & through the house. There is a real empathy with how children will perceive & enjoy the space in the way Peter speaks about the internal planning.










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  • Mahir Sayar Txaqo 2:30 am on March 27, 2012 Permalink |
    Tags: Australia, Brisbane, , , Richard Kirk Architect,   

    Arbour House / Richard Kirk Architect 


    © Scott Burrows

    Architects: Richard Kirk Architect
    Location: New Farm, Brisbane, Queensland,
    Completed: 2009
    Structural Engineer: Bornhorst & Ward
    Hydraulic Engineer: Cushway Blackford
    Photographer: Scott Burrows

     

    © Scott Burrows

    Arbour House, located on the Bulimba Reach of the Brisbane River, is a study in siting and intricate articulation to yield views and landscape connections . The long thin 13 meter wide site is located between two key public spaces, namely an established historic arbour of fig trees and a public riverfront boardwalk. The site which once formed part of the surrounding multi-residential enclave is now distinquished by a new single detached dwelling. Unlike other riverfront houses, the new dwelling is sited a respectful distance from the rivers edge, preserving an 80 year old Poincianna tree and historic public views from the boardwalk of the adjoing heritage listed dwelling.

    © Scott Burrows

    The large setback creates a platform for a private garden under the shade of the canopy of the Poincianna tree. The level of the platform and the height of the Poincianna tree and the Arbour established the two datums for the setout of public and private spaces of the dwelling. The public riverfront living levels are adjacent to this space whislt the rear living spaces are elevated above the garage to look into the canopy of the Arbour. The private bedroom spaces of the upper level are raised to a height to afford views of the tree canopy and river yet privacy from the public river boardwalk.

    © Scott Burrows

    The dwelling adopts a courtyard typology with two pavillions linked by a large double height stairwell and external courtyard. The form is conceptualised as an object carved from a solid volume of the allowable building area with the courtyard providing a protective volume from which to cross ventilate each of the spaces of the house and to allow the different spaces of the house connection but also discrete and subtle separation – the family home as a village.

    © Scott Burrows

    The long section of the dwelling is key – the front pavilion folds and adjusts to its riverfront landscape while the rear pavillion is raised higher to enjoy views onto the canopy of the surounding arbour and facilitate a cross view through the long site to the river. The dwelling orientates itself around a large external courtyard. The courtyard articulates the form of the dwelling and creates a heroic moment from which to enter.

    © Scott Burrows

    The northern face of the building form is articulated by rotating the external walls 15 degrees. The walls peel away from each other resulting in thin vertical fissures which allow northern light and breezes to filter through. The vertical fissures afford the significant rooms of the house a private visual connection to views down the longest reach of the Brisbane River.

    1st floor plan

    The materiality of the dwelling is defined by an exterior and interior skin. The external zinc clad skin acts as a robust barrier to the elements wrapping and folding to protect the inner skins that are generally made of recycled bespoke timbers employed as facade systems and cladding layers. The internal skin is comprised of a number of recycled timbers selected for their durability and colour. The timber is tailored like a bespoke piece of joinery to the specific requirements of the spaces and the spaces are treated in a similar manner whether internal or external.

















     
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